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India Corporate - Group taxation

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Group taxation is not permitted under the Indian tax law.

Transfer pricing

Transfer pricing on international transactions

The Indian transfer pricing regulations (ITPR) stipulate that income arising from ‘international transactions’ between ‘associated enterprises’ should be computed having regard to the ‘arm’s-length price’. Furthermore, any allowance for expenses or interest arising from any international transaction is also to be determined having regard to the arm’s-length price. The expressions ‘international transactions’ and ‘associated enterprises’ have been defined in the ITPR.

The ITPR also contain the concept of ‘deemed international transaction’ whereby a transaction between an enterprise and a third party (whether based in India or overseas) would be subjected to transfer pricing regulations in case there exists a prior agreement in relation to such a transaction between the third party and the associated enterprise of the transacting enterprise or if the terms of such a transaction are determined in substance between the third party and the associated enterprise of the transacting enterprise.

The ITPR also define a certain class of transactions undertaken by a taxpayer with its domestic related parties and whose aggregate value exceeds INR 200 million as specified domestic transactions to which the transfer pricing provisions apply.

Initially, the ITPR prescribed five methods for computation of arm’s-length price. These are broadly in line with OECD Guidelines. A sixth method, termed as the ‘other method’, was notified in 2012. Taxpayers are required to adopt the most appropriate method for determining the arm’s-length price.

Taxpayers are also required to maintain a comprehensive set of prescribed information and documents relating to international transactions and specified domestic transactions that are undertaken between associated enterprises, on an annual basis, within the prescribed timelines (due date of filing the income tax return). Taxpayers being a constituent entity of an international group shall also keep and maintain such information and documents (essentially master file and country-by-country [CbC] report) in respect of the international group. Further, taxpayers are required to obtain an Accountant’s Report from an independent accountant certifying the nature and amount of international transactions. The certificate needs to be filed along with the income tax return. The burden of proving the arm’s-length character of the transaction is primarily on the taxpayer.

The taxpayer is required to comply with the above requirements on an annual basis.

The ITPR adopt an arithmetic mean of comparable prices as the arm's-length price, with a flexibility of deviation from the percentage that is notified by the Central Government as +/- 1% for wholesalers and +/- 3% for others. The CBDT has also prescribed rules for use of range for determining arm’s-length price, which is discussed subsequently. Where the transfer pricing officer is of the opinion that the arm’s-length price was not applied, the officer may re-compute the taxable income after giving the taxpayer an opportunity to be heard. Stringent penalties are prescribed in cases of failure to comply with the provisions of the ITPR.

Notified Jurisdictional Area (NJA)

The Indian government is empowered to declare a country/territory with which there does not exist an effective mechanism for exchange of information as an NJA.

Any transaction between a taxpayer and a person located in an NJA or a transaction entered into by a taxpayer wherein one of the parties is located in an NJA will be covered under the ITPR. However, the benefit of the +/- 3% range and the option to be covered under the Safe Harbour Rules would not be available in this case.

Safe Harbour Rules

Safe Harbour Rules were notified in 2013. These rules prescribe who the eligible taxpayers are, which are the eligible international transactions, the target operating margin, procedural aspects, timeline for audit, etc. Thereafter, these Safe Harbour Rules were also extended to certain domestic transactions.

The Safe Harbour Rules were initially applicable for a maximum of five tax years beginning with tax year 2013-14.

Thereafter, in June 2017, the CBDT made amendments to the Safe Harbour Rules reducing the target operating margins for most of the eligible international transactions. Further, the revised Safe Harbour Rules introduced receipt of low value-adding intra-group services to the list of eligible transactions subject to certain thresholds. Also, there were certain modifications made to the definitions of certain terms vis-à-vis in the original Safe Harbour Rules. The revised Safe Harbour Rules are applicable for a maximum of three tax years beginning with tax year 2017-18 with the taxpayers having an option to apply the original Safe Harbour Rules or the revised Safe Harbour Rules for the tax year 2017-18, whichever is more beneficial.

Where a taxpayer has opted to be covered under the Safe Harbour Rules and the transfer price declared has been accepted by the tax authorities, then such a taxpayer cannot invoke proceedings under a Mutual Agreement Procedure (MAP).

Advance pricing agreements (APAs)

An APA is an arrangement between the taxpayer and the tax authorities covering transactions, with a view to pre-empt potential transfer pricing disputes. The CBDT has notified detailed rules providing the procedures and necessary forms for application/administration of APAs.

The rules provide for constitution of an APA team, which shall consist of an income tax authority and experts from economics, statistics, law, and other necessary fields. APAs can be applied to existing, as well as proposed, transactions.

The rules have provided for both unilateral and bilateral/multilateral APAs. In cases where a bilateral APA negotiated between competent authorities is not acceptable to the taxpayer, the taxpayer may, at its option, continue with the process of entering into a unilateral APA without benefit of a MAP.

The salient features of the procedure laid down for APAs are application for APA, withdrawal of APA, defective application, procedure, compliances post-APA, cancellations of APA, and revisions and renewal of APA.

The legislation has provisions of roll-back of APAs for four years prior to the first year covered under the APA.

Rules prescribing the use of ‘range’ and multiple year data

The CBDT has notified the rules prescribing the scheme for the usage of the ‘range’ concept and multiple year financial data for determining the arm’s-length price. These rules are applicable to international transactions and specified domestic transactions that are entered into by taxpayers on or after 1 April 2014.

The rules envisage the applicability of the ‘range’ concept and multiple year data only where the arm’s-length price determination is done using either the transactional net margin method, resale price method, cost plus method, or comparable uncontrolled price method. Furthermore, the rules in connection with the applicability of the ‘range’ concept, inter alia, prescribe the adequate number of external comparables and the methodology for computing the upper and lower percentile. In case the number of external comparables identified is not adequate, the ‘range’ concept will not apply and the concept of arithmetic mean will continue to apply.

The multiple year data can only be used if the most appropriate method selected of benchmarking purposes is either transactional net margin method, resale price method, or cost plus method. Further, multiple year data entails use of data for the year under consideration (current year) and data for up to two preceding financial years. Data for the current year is compulsorily to be considered. If the data for the current year is available and is not comparable on account of either qualitative or quantile reasons, the comparable cannot be considered.

Master File and Country-by-country (CbC) reporting documentation as per base erosion and profit shifting (BEPS)

The Government has introduced three-layered transfer pricing documentation requirements in line with the international standard as per the BEPS Action Plan 13. Taxpayers will now be required to prepare a master file, local file and country-by-country reporting (CbCR). The new regime will be applicable from financial year 2016-17. The CBDT has notified the final rules for maintaining and furnishing of Transfer Pricing documentation in the master file and CbCR.

As per the Rules, the master file shall be applicable to every Indian taxpayer (called as a constituent entity – CE) part of an international group (whether inbound or outbound) having an annual consolidated turnover of over INR 5 billion (USD 76 million) in the preceding accounting year of the parent company and meeting certain other thresholds of the quantum of aggregate value of international transactions. Again, the Indian taxpayer will have to furnish the master file with the specified tax authority. For Indian subsidiaries with parent companies resident outside India, the master file will have to be furnished even if it is filed by the parent entity in its home country or by a designated entity in its home country. The documentation prescribed by the Rules in respect of the master file is largely in line with OECD’s final BEPS Action Plan 13 report, however, there are certain additional information requirements like the description of the functions, assets and risks (FAR) analysis of all CEs within the Group that contribute at least 10 percent of revenues or assets or profits of the group; detailed description of the financial arrangements of the group, including the names and address of the top 10 unrelated lenders; and a list of all entities of the international group engaged in development and management of intangible property along with their addresses.

The CbCR will be applicable only for taxpayers having an annual consolidated group turnover of over INR 55 billion (USD 850 million) in the preceding accounting year of the parent company. A parent entity of an outbound international group, resident in India, will have to file the CbCR with the specified tax authority. For Indian subsidiaries with parent companies resident outside India, the CbCR will ordinarily be filed by the parent entity in its home country or by a designated entity in its home country. The Indian tax authorities will access the CbCR through mutual exchange of information agreements with such country, failing which the Indian subsidiary will be required to furnish the report.

In case there are multiple entities of the same international group resident in India, one of the entities will have to be identified as the designated entity for filing the master file as well as for other communication in respect of the master file and the CbCR. Further, the Rules have prescribed various Forms for intimations to be filed with the specified tax authority and filing of the master file and CbCR with the specified tax authority at various dates. For financial year 2016-17, the due dates for filing of the various intimations as well as for filing the master file and CbCR have been extended and are now with reference to 31 March, 2018 (which is also the due date for filing the master file and CbCR). For financial year 2017-18 onwards, the due date for filing the master file and CbCR is the specified due date for filing the annual tax returns (which as of now is 30 November, 2018).

Significant penalty provisions will apply for non-compliance and furnishing inaccurate information.

Restrictions on interest deduction

The BEPS Action Plan 4 recommends alternate approaches for countries to limit tax base erosion through interest deductions and other financial payments. Provisions have been introduced in the Income-tax Act, 1961, which seek to limit the interest deduction of Indian companies or PEs of foreign companies in India. Taxpayers engaged in banking or insurance business are specifically excluded.

The provision will apply to interest or similar expenses paid (including those paid on existing debt) to (i) overseas associated enterprises or (ii) third-party lenders for whom the underlying debt is backed by an implicit or explicit guarantee or equivalent deposit from overseas associated enterprises.

Any interest paid for the year under consideration in excess of 30% of the earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortisation (EBITDA) of the taxpayer will be treated as excess interest. Excess interest disallowed in a year will be eligible for carry forward up to eight consecutive years, subject to the above limits. The provision will, however, not apply to interest paid or payable up to INR 10 million.

The proposed provisions that limit the interest deductions have largely adopted the ‘Fixed Ratio Rule’ proposed as a best practice approach under BEPS Action Plan 4, however, with some differences. It is relevant to note that the provisions do not correspondingly limit the WHT liability or taxability of the non-resident associated enterprise on the interest income. The provisions will apply from financial year 2017/18 onwards.

Secondary adjustment

To align the ITPR with the OECD Guidelines and international practices, provisions have been introduced in the ITPR for a secondary adjustment. The secondary adjustment is an adjustment in the books of account of the taxpayer and its associated enterprise to reflect that the actual allocation of profits between the Indian taxpayer and its associated enterprise are consistent with the transfer price determined as a result of primary adjustment. This is intended to remove the imbalance between the cash account and actual profit of the Indian taxpayer.

The secondary adjustment is required only where a primary adjustment to the transfer price occurs in one of the following circumstances:

  • Where adjustment has been made on one’s own by the taxpayer in one’s income-tax return.
  • Adjustment made by the Assessing Officer has been accepted by the taxpayer.
  • Arising due to the APA signed.
  • Application of safe harbour rules.
  • Settlement arrived at under the MAP route.

However, an exception has been made according to which such secondary adjustments shall not be carried out by the taxpayer if the amount of the primary adjustment made in the case of a taxpayer does not exceed INR10 million.

According to this provision, excess money arising from primary transfer pricing adjustments not repatriated into India within the prescribed time limit will be deemed as an advance made by the Indian taxpayer to its associated enterprise. The effect of the advance is given by way of an imputation of interest on such advance as prescribed. The time period for computing such interest and the interest rate have not been prescribed yet.

The provisions relating to secondary transfer pricing adjustment are generally applicable for primary transfer pricing adjustments made from financial year 2016/17 onwards.

Thin capitalisation

No prescribed debt-to-equity ratios or thin capitalisation rules exist under Indian taxation law. However, interest paid to related parties at rates or on terms that are considered unreasonably high are disallowable by the tax officer.

Controlled foreign companies (CFCs)

India currently has no CFC rules, so there will be no Indian tax on foreign profits that remain unremitted from offshore subsidiaries.


Last Reviewed - 07 December 2017

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